Is fish considered meat??

Greetings Carnivores,

Here’s an interesting question I have come across MANY times:

Is fish “meat”?

The answer is actually very simple, … or is it?

I was taught many years ago, ALL muscle IS meat. The body is basically broken down into muscle, fat, sinew and bone. Everything that is a muscle (including the Heart) is considered protein, and therefore … meat.

Simple, right?

Well, “if” all muscle is “meat” then, … the flesh of any fish is almost entirely muscle and therefore a protein (considered to be one of the very best sources of protein) and by the simple definition, must be “meat”, right?

Listen, … I’m going to be “Switzerland” on this one from here on out. I don’t want to upset any particular beliefs so, I just present the following for you to decide:

Catholicism considers fish to be in a separate category because they are not warm blooded mammals, do not reside on land, and breathe air and therefore ok to consume during Lent.

Fair enough.

In culinary terms, fish IS considered to be in a separate category so … is it meat??

I’ll leave it up to you to decide.

Don’t fight, lord knows there’s too much of that in the world these days. 🙂 🙂 🙂

That’s it for today Carnivores, thanks for dropping in … Oh, and by the way … you can share this post with your peeps by following my Blog … otherwise, just scroll down to the “share” area below and “click” on any of the buttons and … share away!!

Please, stay tuned and … please click “follow” on this page (Carnivore Confidential). You’ll get an email notice every time I write something new. And, … no need to worry about being bombarded with junk … WordPress is VERY responsible.

Until next time Carnivores, stay hungry and as usual, please like and share my posts on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/carnivoreconfidential
And, follow on Twitter @DougieDee

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High Mountain Seasonings, Buckboard Bacon Cure … Do I have your attention yet??

Greetings Carnivores,

Today I’m going to walk you through the way I made some Side bacon at home.

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Anyway you slice it (see what I did there??) it’s a bit of a long process. But, … like many things in life, it’s a labour of love and well worth it in the end.

Here we go.

Head out to your local butcher and buy a slab of boneless pork Belly, about 1 Kg. (2.5 Lbs.) You can find it either Rind-on or off. The rind is the skin of the Hog and is unappealingly chewy unless it’s cooked to a very crispy texture. When left on the pork belly and made into bacon, it provides a really crispy “crunch” mouthfeel.

For mine, I bought it “Rind-on” but I removed it when I got home. I did this because I wanted to make Pork rind crisps AKA Chicharron. I’ll write about that in the near future, stay tuned 🙂

Before I started the curing process, I wanted to add a nice smokey flavour to my Pork belly without cooking it so, I set up my cold smoke generator from A-MAZE-N products and filled it with enough Pecan (my FAVOURITE) pellets from Traeger to smoke for a good 2 hours, and lit the fuse.

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I say “lit the fuse” meaning, I got out my handy torch and blasted the top layer of pellets until they were on fire, let them burn for 5 minutes then, blew out the flames.

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With the fuse lit and the pellets smoking nicely, I placed my smoke generator in the bottom of my bbq, than replaced the grill and added my beautiful Pork belly then, closed the lid and let the smoke perform its magic.

2 hours later, I pulled this smokey, beautiful, Pork belly off the grill and started the curing process.

Today I’m using Buckboard Bacon cure from High Mountain Seasonings  I found this stuff at my Local Bass Pro shop and since then, I’ve visited them many times online. (link provided above).

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The box comes with 3 packages of cure, more than enough to do a whole Boston butt but, today I’m making bacon so, I liberally coated my Pork belly all over, set it in a covered glass dish and placed it in the fridge. As you can see, I removed the skin before I started the rub.

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** VERY IMPORTANT NOTE**

Do NOT use a metal pan for curing, the salt will leach a metallic taste into your finished product.

Every day for 14 days, I turned the belly over and replaced it back in the fridge. You will find the cure pulls a lot of moisture out of the belly … not to worry … all’s good.

After 14 days, I pulled it out of the fridge and rinsed it thoroughly in cold water then, I put it back in a CLEAN glass dish, covered it with fresh water and stuck it back into the fridge. You MUST do this in order pull the salt out of the meat. Do this every day for 5 days.

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In the end, you’ll be rewarded with this gorgeous piece of freshly cured, beautifully smoked side bacon you made all by yourself.

With a REALLY sharp knife, go ahead and slice it up. Just so you know, … it’s very difficult to slice it thinly so, don’t stress … just go ahead and cut it into thick slices. When you get to the end, and you can’t get another slice out of what’s left without cutting yourself … just cut it up into little chunks, cubes, whatever.

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I fried my little leftover bits and was going to use them in a Ceasar salad for dinner but … they didn’t last that long … between me and my beautiful Pooches, we devoured them in minutes.

I hope you’ll try this for yourselves and please, leave me a comment to let me know how you made out …

That’s it for today Carnivores 🙂 🙂

Thanks for dropping in … Oh, and by the way … you can share this post with your peeps by following my Blog … otherwise, just scroll down to the “share” area below and “click” on any of the buttons and … share away!!  🙂 🙂

Please, stay tuned and … please click “follow” on this page (Carnivore Confidential). You’ll get an email notice every time I write something new. And, … no need to worry about being bombarded with junk … WordPress is VERY responsible.  🙂

Until next time Carnivores, stay hungry and as usual, please like and share my posts on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/carnivoreconfidential

And, follow on Twitter @DougieDee

 

 

Why so Cheeky? The secret behind Beef, Pork and Fish cheeks.

Greetings Carnivores,

Have you ever found yourself in a restaurant and noticed something called Braised Beef Cheeks on the menu? You have probably never even SEEN it on a menu but, IF you do … give it a try.

You will be astounded and probably ask yourself “where has THIS been all my life”???

Cheek meat has largely been overlooked in Western cuisine but, to the rest of the world, particularly South America and Europe, it is a delicacy.

In the farm to plate, nose to tail movement that has been gathering momentum lately, a lot of folks are opening their eyes and minds to this little known (at least around here) meaty morsel.

It comes from the small hollow on either side of the face and, whether it’s Beef, Pork or Halibut for that matter, it really is one of the tastiest cuts on the carcass.

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Italians cure the Pork Cheeks and Jowls and call it Guanciale. Although Pancetta is a common substitute in cooking, it differs from pancetta in it’s flavour profile and overall porkiness.

Now, off you go to the butcher shop and ask for some Beef Cheeks then, Google a recipe for Barbacoa Beef Cheek Tacos

HEAVEN !!

That’s it for today Carnivores … I’m in the middle of a major bathroom renovation and, I need to get back to work.

Thanks for dropping in … Oh, and by the way … you can share this post with your peeps by following my Blog … otherwise, just scroll down to the “share” area below and “click” on any of the buttons and … share away!!  🙂 🙂

Please, stay tuned and … please click “follow” on this page (Carnivore Confidential). You’ll get an email notice every time I write something new. And, … no need to worry about being bombarded with junk … WordPress is VERY responsible.  🙂

Until next time Carnivores, stay hungry and as usual, please like and share my posts on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/carnivoreconfidential

And, follow on Twitter @DougieDee

Brine or not to Brine: the answer is … YES

Greetings Carnivores,

I wrote a post a couple of weeks ago called Brisket 101 for my buddy Steve and, he has since asked another question: To brine or not to brine a Brisket?

And, last week I wrote something I called The Grim Reaper tour 2016 and, the best Turkey you’ll ever cook where I mentioned the simple “Brine” I used to infuse flavour into my Turkey. My friend Gwennie asked me to elaborate on that one as well.

Well Steveo and Gwennie, two birds with one stone … here you go   🙂

When you introduce Beef, Pork, Poultry … anything really to a brine, something magical happens and it’s mainly boring old food science (Google it here) but, in essence the salt helps to prevent moisture loss. Moisture loss is inevitable during the cooking process so, if we can do something to slow that down … Hellllooooooooo brine.  🙂 🙂

I’m going to deal with Steve first and address the Brisket question.

When putting  anything in a Brine, not only are you adding flavour but you are essentially “Curing” it as well, and in the case of a fresh Beef Brisket, the end result (depending on the spices you use) is either Corned beef or Pastrami. Now, … before I have every Deli from coast to coast yelling at me, … there are many differences between the two but, it all starts with the BRINE.

Corned beef generally comes from the Brisket portion of the carcass, while Pastrami can come from the Brisket, Navel (Brisket Plate) or even the Outside Round.

The Brine I use for making both is basic and as follows:

*Note*

Use these measurements to double or triple the recipe.

*Basic ratio: 1 Cup of water per 1 Tbs salt*

So:

8 Cups of cold water

8 Tbs kosher salt (you “may” want to adjust the salt more or less to suit your own taste)

3/4 cup  Brown Sugar

1 level tsp per 5 lbs meat, Prague Powder #1

2 Cinnamon sticks

2 Tbs Whole Mustard seeds

2 Tbs whole Black Pepper corns

15 Juniper Berries

1 Tbs Ginger powder

15 Whole cloves

15 Whole Allspice Berries

5 Large Bay Leaves

4-5 Whole Garlic Cloves

Combine all ingredients in a large stock pot and bring to a boil making sure all the salt and sugar are dissolved. Remove from heat and shock with 2 lbs of ice.

When the Brine is COMPLETELY cooled, pour over the Brisket and refrigerate for up to 14 days.

*Note*

I like to use 2 LARGE zip-lock bags (doubled) to make sure the meat is completely submerged and no leaks. 

Rinse, then to cook the cured Corned Beef, I chop the Holy Trinity of celery, carrots and onions and layer them on the bottom of a roasting pan to act as a rack for your Brisket to sit on top of. Next, you need moisture and water is a natural but, why stop there? I use chicken stock for added flavour or, even apple juice. Go ahead and experiment.  🙂

Fill pan half way and cook, covered for 3-4 hours at 300 degrees.

Now for Pastrami, it’s important to desalinate the meat before proceeding by soaking it in a pot of fresh clean water for at least 8 hours prior to rubbing and smoking, otherwise you’ll be drinking gallons of water after your meal.

The rub I use is pretty generic and goes something like this (you can change it around to suit you own tastes) and, depending on how large your piece of meat is, you’ll want to double or even triple the measurements:

4-6 heaping Tbs course ground black pepper

2 (ish) Tbs ground Coriander

1 tsp (each) Brown sugar, Dry mustard

2 tsp (each) Onion and Garlic powder

*you can leave any of these out EXCEPT the pepper and coriander*

Combine all the dry ingredients and rub liberally all over the meat and refrigerate for at least 24 hours.

Smoke indirectly at 225-230 degrees until the meat reaches what the BBQ gods refer to as the “stall” (150 degrees) then, finish by steaming it gently (covered) for 3 hours being careful not to let the pot boil dry.

There you go Steveo … let me know how you make out buddy.  🙂 🙂

Now Gwennie … my basic brine for poultry is as follows: (and the spices change regularly, depending on what I’m wearing)  🙂 🙂

SALT/WATER RATIO SAME AS ABOVE:

8 Cups of cold water

8 Tbs Kosher salt

2/3 Cup Brown sugar

3/4 Cup Soy sauce

1/4 Cup Olive oil

1 Tbs Black pepper corns

2 Tbs Rosemary (fresh is best)

2 Whole oranges (halved)

2-3 Bay leaves

Combine everything in a large pot and bring to a boil to dissolve the salt and sugar, remove from heat and shock with 2 pounds of ice.

When the brine is COMPLETELY cooled, submerge the bird and cover, refrigerated for at LEAST 24 hours or longer. If you don’t have anything large enough to completely submerge the bird, try using two oven roasting bags (doubled) and tie the bags off securely then place in a pan in case of leaks and refrigerate.

To cook, rinse thoroughly, stuff the cavity with oranges, onions, fresh thyme … whatever you like and cook, low and slow referring to this post: Carnivore Confidential

There you go Steve and Gwennie … please enjoy, like and comment … 🙂 🙂

Oh and, by the way … Gwennie, you can share this post with your peeps by following my Blog … otherwise, just scroll down to the “share” area below and “click” on the “email” button … that’ll take you to an email page and … share away!!  🙂 🙂

That’s it for today Carnivores but please, stay tuned and … please click “follow” on this page (Carnivore Confidential). You’ll get an email notice every time I write something new. And, … no need to worry about being bombarded with junk … WordPress is VERY responsible.  🙂

Until next time Carnivores, stay hungry and as usual, please follow my posts on Twitter @DougieDee and like and share them on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/carnivoreconfidential

London Broil…Canadian Style

My friend Tony, weighed in on my Canadian version of the London Broil … this was his take on it.
Thx for the “props” Tony, glad you liked it 🙂
C.C.

Tony Meets Meat

So, a few weeks ago I did a “London broil“. Carnivore Confidential weighed in on the Canadian version of “London Broil“. It looked so good I had to do my thing to it. Just so happened that I had made some bratwurst here over the weekend and had some leftover that I did not put in casings. Perfect for this application. Grab a nice top round. 2015-06-23 16.40.39

Butterfly that thing then grab a meat tenderizer and beat the crap out of it without tearing it up too bad.2015-06-23 16.46.25

Trim off any necessary to create a better shape and put on a good log of sausage. In my case, the bratwurst. 2015-06-23 16.49.28

Roll it up tight and lightly coat the outside with your favorite seasoning blend. Not too much though as the sausage has a lot of flavor.  Wrap it up in plastic wrap then put it into the freezer for…

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A little clarification …

Greetings Carnivores,
This is something I wrote back in the early days of my Blog when I didn’t have very many followers.
I believe it’s worth revisiting …
Stay hungry folks 🙂

Carnivore Confidential

Greetings Carnivores,

When I started writing this Blog, I was only posting to Facebook. I obtained the domain name “Carnivore Confidential” but, everything I wrote was posted to F/B.

let’s face it folks … not everyone drank the F/B Koolaid.

It never occurred to me that anyone NOT associated with F/B wouldn’t be able to read my posts.

Ya, … I know naive but, I digress.

Unfortunately F/B limits me to 150 words per post and, I realised I was losing ‘traffic’. So, I obtained this website for Carnivore Confidential. Then, I started writing short ‘teasers’ for my posts on F/B and asked readers to “read the rest” at www.carnivoreconfidential.com. I figured this way, EVERYONE outside of the F/B world could read my stuff if they chose to do so.

Now, it’s come to my attention recently that some people are not comfortable being re-directed, or asked to “go…

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The Juicy Lucy – the Ultimate Cheese Stuffed Burger

This is a re blogged post I’m sure my readers will love … enjoy 🙂

Frugal Hausfrau

The Juicy Lucy (or Jucy Lucy), the iconic cheese stuffed burger, is a Minnesota thing, you betcha! Two rival Minnesota bars, Matt’s and the 5-8 Tavern have been making these for decades, but recently the cheese stuffed burger has gone all gourmet and with good reason. There’s something about a great crusty burger with an ooey, gooey, cheesy filling that just puts all other cheeseburgers to shame.

Juicy Lucy - Cut in half, but of course you don't want to do this! Juicy Lucy – Cut in half, but of course you don’t want to do this!

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